When is a Peche de Vigne not a Peche de Vigne?

A couple of years ago we bought a young peach tree, a Peche de Vigne, from Dobies and planted it in the polytunnel. The first tree was damaged and a replacement was sent later in the year. I have been really looking forward to trying the fruit and this year it bore for the first time. We have been eating the fruit for the last few weeks, and took the final, now rather overripe example, today. The peaches were on the small side, a fairly smooth skin, covered with a pleasant crimson flushing that covered most of the fruit. The flesh was white, adhered to the stone, and was of reasonable flavour, better than supermarket fare but by no means exceptional for a garden fruit. The fruit was not the equal of our glasshouse specimens of Early Rivers and Bellegarde.

The real Peche de Vigne has a more heavily furred skin which gives its deep red colour a dull beige appearance. The flesh is deep red, often through to the stone, hence, also known as a blood peach. It is also bears later in the season. Our tree is definitely not a Peche de Vigne. This is a great disappointment, as we have wasted a couple of years of growth on a tree that is not the correct variety and almost certainly not one that I would choose to grow. Dobies have offered a replacement when they become available in late autumn, so now I have to decide what to do with the current tree. It is healthy, seems to bear well, but is planted where I would want the Peche de Vigne to be. One option is to utilise the end face of the glasshouse that currently houses two fan trained trees against the rear wall. This end face is only 8’ 6” wide but is quite tall. It might be possible to do something in this space.

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